Is Ayurvedic Diagnosis moving the Allopathic way?

The advent of technology has seen innovations and inventions in almost all fields. In recent years, the market has seen the emergence of devices that diagnose the pulse. I had a personal meeting with the inventor of one such machine and also had an experience of Nadi Pariskha with one such device.

This machine is making inroads into the clinics of Ayurveda doctors and they plan to capture major market share with their aggressive marketing team.

What’s in it for an Ayurveda Doctor?

Well, the machine gives you an impressive graphical representation of the pulse. Its evaluation is an averaging of patient data that’s been collected before. I wouldn’t say it’s a conclusive evidence of a diagnosis! It’s just a gross representation. A doctor must still use his or her intellect to ascertain the correctness of the diagnosis by their own methods.

The inventor of the pulse diagnosing machine shared that his marketing team is first targeting those BAMS doctors who are weak in their diagnosis. This way, the inventor believes he is serving a purpose. The truth is that such doctors may make a quick buck by showcasing this machine and care little about their patients. The charts they’ll show their patients may add some glamour to their business.

However, its not the machine we’re talking about. The problem is elsewhere. The machines are making a headway only because of the faulty system.

Firstly, the doctors study Ayurveda shastras for 5 years. Then, they end up interning in a modern medical hospital diagnosing according to modern diagnostic methods and prescribing English medicines.

When they come out after their internship, they’ve almost forgotten everything of what they learnt about Ayurvedic Medical Sciences in the 5 years.

In short, the system doesn’t infuse value in its own practitioners. The system depletes self worth of BAMS graduates.

By thrusting this machine into the hands of the Ayurvedic doctors, the inventor hopes to increase the patient inflow of the practicing doctors thereby increasing their monthly revenues.

What do these Ayurvedic doctors stand to lose?

In the long run, these doctors are bound to forget how to evaluate the results according to Ayurveda and instead will work like lab technicians, printing computer generated reports.

A study conducted in the year 2000 evaluates how modern medical practice improved in technology and deteriorated in terms of evaluating the results causing a dent in doctors, accurately diagnosing symptoms. Here is a paragraph from the document. The whole document can be accessed from here.

Modern medical practice makes extensive use of laboratory tests, radiological imaging, and other technologies in decision-making regarding diagnosis, prognosis, monitoring, screening, and risk assessment. Despite remarkable technical testing methods and continuous improvement in analytical accuracy and precision of tests, the evaluation of the diagnostic accuracy of new tests often has received only modest attention. Thus, available tests may be analytically accurate but not provide reliable clinical information for diagnosis, risk stratification, and other clinical matters.

The best way forward is that doctors learn Nadi Pariskha so that any machine invented becomes an optional tool for a Vaidya to add in their clinic or hospital. Nadi Pariksha is a necessary tool that doctors have to learn. You can pre-order my upcoming book Nadi Pariksha – The Sacred Science of Pulse Diagnosis. This book is originally priced at ₹599. I am giving it away at ₹399.

In conclusion, if machines make a headway, which the inventor says, is inevitable, and doctors don’t learn Nadi Pariskha, there’s a threat that they’ll replace ancient and intrinsically Ayurvedic diagnostic techniques. This may cause irreparable damage to the entire medical stream and may transform the way Ayurveda is practiced.

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